Kiwi ticketing company looks to disrupt the Australian market with new ticketing system TixSuite

ticketing

New Zealand ticketing company Eventfinda has launched a new ticketing model in Australia providing ticketing software via subscription.

TixSuite’s ticketing system sells subscriptions to its proprietary software, giving venues, promoters, and event organisers control over their ticketing.

Unlike legacy ticketing services, there are zero per-ticket fees charged to ticket purchasers or event organisers. TixSuite users can choose to charge a booking fee or no fees at all.

The fee amount is set at the organisers’ discretion, ranging from zero booking fees to an amount that covers expenses or more. Whatever they choose, all booking fees are theirs to keep – giving them control over all their customer revenue streams.

The current business model generally sees legacy ticketing services holding all the cash from ticket sales until after the event, stalling cash flow for the event organiser.

This process creates challenges for promoters who must stump up significant capital, particularly at a time when buyers are waiting until the last minute to purchase tickets – creating uncertainty around the viability of events.

TixSuite enables users to collect 100 peer cent of their ticketing revenue up front, removing the financial burden and stress from promoters, venues and event organisers.

“For too long venues and promoters in Australia have been at the behest of an outdated ticketing model and legacy ticketing services, which leaves them with little or no control over fees or cash flow,” said Eventfinda CEO James McGlinn.

“Venues and promoters are forced to deal with legacy ticketing services that don’t allow them to collect revenue upfront, and force them to pass on ‘junk fees’ charged to ticket purchasers.

“TixSuite has been designed with the express purpose of putting control back in the hands of those running events, through a straightforward subscription model. For those that choose to charge fees, venues and promoters can communicate to ticket buyers exactly what that fee will be used for – whether that be for venue upgrades, collecting donations for charity, or anything in between.”